Saturday, April 22, 2017

The Chronicles of Keimathea, Part IV - The Banquet Table of the King

The Keimathea Chronicles - a Christian Worldview parable - Part IV

Redemption - Glorification: The Banquet Table of the King


The question, at the end of the evening, is what we will do in the midst of the suffering and evil in our lives.  The citizens of Keimathea faced the same question—how would they respond to King Ma’alekei’s invitation in the corrupted kingdom they experienced?
One day, the good and wise king entered a small village on the fringes of the realm—far from the palace, and very close to the outer darkness.  Three young women—Alyssa, Karin, and Maya—emerged and talked with the king.  Ma’alekei gave them food, money, clothing, and some extravagant silk fabrics out of his royal bounty.  He re-affirmed his eternal love for the three girls, and invited them to come and join the banquet at the castle in the heart of the kingdom.  The three women, awe-struck, listened silently as the King talked. 

Thursday, April 20, 2017

The Chronicles of Keimathea, Part III - Hints of Redemption

The Keimathea Chronicles - A Christian Worldview Parable

Part 3 - After the Fall, Hints of Redemption


We return to the Korrupted Kingdom of Keimathea – once a realm of undisturbed peace and prosperity, protected from darkness and harm by the sovereign rule of King Ma’alekei the wise.  After Joronae’s treacherous theft of the royal diadem, however, all was no longer well in Keimathea.  Ma’alekei continued to shower his blessings upon the people, freely bestowing upon them all that they could need and want—food, shelter, music, books, entertainment—even NHL hockey.  But, just as Joronae had coveted the king’s crown, so too now his fellow Keimatheans began to focus, not on the Great King who had blessed them, nor the good things with which he had blessed them—no, instead, the citizens of the Kingdom were no longer content with what they had.  They each and all noticed the good things that others had, and began to desire and seek those good things in addition to their rightful gifts.  The desire for others’ good things led to theft, violence, even murder, as Keimatheans opposed and hated one another in their pursuit of what they thought would complete their lives. 

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Chronicles of Keimathea - a Christian Worldview Parable - Part II: Joronae's Fall

The Keimathea Chronicles, Part II

King Ma’alekei continued to rule his realm with wisdom, and the people continued to enjoy prosperity and peace.  During one of the King’s nightly banquets at the palace, a young man joined in the festivities for the first time of his life.  Joronae was exceptionally handsome, his mind razor-sharp.  He was well-loved by his fellow Keimatheans, and King Ma’alekei inwardly held Joronae to be the pinnacle of his kingly work.  Ma’alekei had personally taught and guided the young man for years, instructing him in botany, alchemy, architecture, zoology, astronomy, and law.  Joronae had come, at a tender young age, to understand the intricacies of royal law, and had a very bright future before him serving in Ma’alekei’s court.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Chronicles of Keimathea - A Christian Worldview Parable - Part I: Wise King, Good Kingdom

Chronicles of Keimathea I - Wise King, Good Kingdom

Over Easter weekend, I had the privilege and joy of teaching a D-Now (Discipleship-Now) event at our home church (Temple Baptist Church, Shawnee OK).  We walked through various aspects of the problem of evil, working within the narrative framework of a Christian worldview: Creation - Fall - Redemption - Glorification.  As part of the teaching materials, I told a series of stories about the Kingdom of Keimathea.  I hope you enjoy them.  Each installment is relatively short, and there will be five altogether.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

An Introduction to Christian Worldview: Worldview Matters!

Why Worldview Study Matters!

In the past few years, I have had the privilege of co-authoring a textbook on Christian worldview with Michael Clark and David Naugle.  As I shared recently, we are excited to announce that the book is now available for pre-order via Amazon, and will be released by IVP Academic on October 28, 2017.  Worldview Textbook - Amazon link  

Last week we finished the "copy-editing" process, the last major round of revisions and additions.  All that remains now is type-setting, indexing, and proof-reading.  In honor of completing the next major portion of the project, I wanted to share a few thoughts regarding the importance of the project - so over the next few weeks we will look at why Worldview is important, and why you ought to engage in some intentional worldview examination and consideration.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Keller, The Reason for God, Part III of III

Keller, Timothy.  The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.  New York: Dutton, 2008. 293 pp.

In introducing the positive apologetic of the second half of the book (“Intermission”), Keller notes that he will be seeking to establish a ‘mere Christianity,’ a faith which affirms the major ecumenical creeds of the early centuries (117).  The reasons he will lay out do not serve as epistemologically compelling proof, a goal which is impossible and cannot even live up to its own standards (118-20).  Rather, he seeks to establish rational arguments that will persuade most rational people (120).  Finally, he suggests that the Christian worldview “makes the most sense of the world,” and invites the reader to put on Christian lenses to see the world through (123).

Keller, The Reason for God, Part II of III

Keller, Timothy.  The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.  New York: Dutton, 2008. 293 pp.

I noted in my last blog post that I consider Timothy Keller to be, potentially, a C. S. Lewis of our age – an apologist who has the intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and literary gifts to communicate the truths and truthfulness of the Christian faith effectively to a broad audience.  I have embarked on a six-part series interacting with Keller’s two most prominent apologetic works, The Reason for God (2008) and Making Sense of God (2016).  Last time, I noted that The Reason for God is split into two major sections – the first half of the book dealing with ‘negative apologetics’ – that is, responding to typical objections against the Christian faith; the second half dealing with ‘positive apologetics’ – that is, setting forth reasons to believe that Christianity is true.  I previously summarized and evaluated the first half of the first half of The Reason for God, analyzing Keller’s responses to charges of religious intolerance (Chapter 1), the problem of evil (Chapter 2), and the inhibition of freedom in Christianity (Chapter 3).  In this post, we will cover the last half of part one, and in my final post on The Reason for God we will look at his positive arguments for Christian faith.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Timothy Keller, The Reason for God - Part I of III

Keller, Timothy.  The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.  New York: Dutton, 2008. 293 pp.


I am, in many ways, an apologetics junkie.  I love the various aspects, topics, issues, styles, methods, approaches, insights, and personalities of Christian apologetics.  Like anyone, I have my favorite apologists.  The Apostle Paul is certainly one; St. Augustine another.  Thomas Aquinas is high up on my list, as is Thomas Sherlocke.  In the 20th century, James Warwick Montgomery, Josh McDowell, Lee Strobel, Gary Habermas, and William Lane Craig have been apologetic heroes.  But my absolute favorite 20th-century apologist is indubitably C. S. Lewis – not because I agree with him about everything, but because he is a masterful communicator, and because his basic approaches to apologetic questions is both sound and winsome.  Lewis was a genius at grasping complex theological truths and communicating them in terms that everyone could comprehend.  Lewis was a master wordsmith who took pride in the craft of creating beautiful prose, even in argumentative form.  Lewis also understood the mind and heart of the non-Christian, and engaged them in their terms on their turf – very effectively at that.
In all of those ways, I tend to hold up Timothy Keller as a 21st-century C. S. Lewis.  Like Lewis, Keller is a broad reader, with deep understanding of the theological truths of the faith as well as the mind of the non-Christian.  Like Lewis, Keller loves learning and language, and crafts lovely literature.  In this next series of blog posts, I intend to interact with two of Keller’s most prominent apologetic works: his 2008 The Reason for God, and his 2016 Making Sense of God.  I will have three blog posts on each book: this post covers the first half of the first half (yes, the repetition was deliberate) of The Reason for God.  

Monday, March 27, 2017

Postmodernism & Truth

Truth Considered & Applied: Examining Postmodernism, History, and Christian Faith. By Stewart E. Kelly. Nashville, TN: B&H Academic, 2011, 376 pp., $29.99 paper.


Stewart Kelly, professor of philosophy at Minot State University (North Dakota), has written a helpful treatise on historical knowledge and truth in a postmodern age.  Kelly divides Truth Considered & Applied into three parts, corresponding to three major questions.  (1) What is postmodernism?  (2) Given postmodernism, is genuine historical knowledge still possible?  (3) How should we think about truth?

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Our Christian Worldview Textbook is Coming!!!!


Very exciting to see this come up on Amazon for the first time.  My co-authored textbook, with Michael Clark and David Naugle, An Introduction to Christian Worldview: Pursuing God's Perspective in a Pluralistic World, is now listed on Amazon and available for pre-order, with a release date of October 28, 2017 (just in time for my birthday!).

Amazon Worldview book page!

There's still lots of work to do to shepherd the book to the finish line, but it's pretty cool to know that our book, nearly 5 years in the making, is just about complete and published.  I'll be sharing more on An Introduction to Christian Worldview as the months move along.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

EPS Dialogue: Ehrman's Resurrection Historiography

So, this past weekend I was in Louisville, Kentucky for the Southeast Regional meeting of the Evangelical Philosophical Society.  Great conference!  I presented a paper I wrote, as a Socratic dialogue featuring Bart Ehrman and his interlocutor, Professor Dart Bearmahn, interrogating Ehrman's historical methodology concerning the post-mortem fate of Jesus of Nazareth.  One of my old professors, Dr. Mark Coppenger, honored me by reading the paper with me - and, I have to say, it was the most fun I have ever had presenting an academic paper!  A new friend, Keith Buhler (currently finishing his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Kentucky) was kind enough to take a bootleg copy of the presentation.  Below, I provide the abstract of the paper, and a link to Keith's Youtube video.  Hope you enjoy it!

Dart Bearmahn: “Why Leah Never Won the Lottery, The Red Sox Didn’t Win the 2004 World Series, Man is Not Descended from Apes, and Jesus Never Died on the Cross.”

Thursday, March 16, 2017

The Need for Apologetics luncheon talk

Last week, I had the opportunity to spend my lunch hour with a business in Oklahoma City; they invited me to come and talk about the need for apologetics in our contemporary context.  The company recorded the talk, and I figured it would be worth posting up here.  Enjoy!


Jasco Apologetics Talk


Thank you once again to Jasco Products for their eagerness to have good conversation about important contemporary theological topics.

Friday, March 10, 2017

The End of Apologetics, Part II - Critical Analysis

Penner, Myron Bradley. The End of Apologetics: Christian Witness in a Postmodern Context. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2013. 180 pp. $19.99.
                       
In my last blog post, I summarized the primary arguments of Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics, a polemic diatribe opposing the modern apologetic enterprise.  Penner’s overarching thesis is that in our postmodern context, apologetic endeavors mired in the concerns and paradigms of Enlightenment modernity are doomed to failure.  Having outlined the contours of his book, I would like, in this post, to engage in a spirited critique of his thought, method, and means.
The End of Apologetics is among the most challenging, perplexing, and frustrating books that I have read in recent memory.  While there are helpful elements to Penner’s treatise (e.g., the emphasis on person-relative sensitivity in apologetic conversation; the importance of how, not just what, we believe, share, and proclaim), the positives are greatly outweighed by the negatives. 

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The End of Apologetics, Part I - Summary

Penner, Myron Bradley. The End of Apologetics: Christian Witness in a Postmodern Context. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2013. 180 pp. $19.99.
                       
In this brief two-part series, I will interact extensively with Myron B. Penner’s The End of Apologetics, published in 2013 by Baker Academic.  The primary content of these blog posts has previously been published in Philosophia Christi 17.1 (2015): 241-47.  In this initial blog essay, I will summarize the primary thrust and arguments in Penner’s book, and in my follow-up I will engage in a spirited critique of his work.
Myron Penner earned his Bachelor and Master’s degrees at Liberty University before completing a Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh.  He has served on faculty at Prairie Bible College (Three Hills, Alberta, Canada), and as an Anglican priest in my hometown, Edmonton, Alberta.  Penner currently is pastor of Trinity International Church in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.  The End of Apologetics is Penner’s polemic diatribe opposing the modern apologetic enterprise, exemplified (for Penner) most clearly by William Lane Craig.  Penner’s overarching thesis is that in our postmodern context, apologetic endeavors mired in the concerns and paradigms of Enlightenment modernity are doomed to failure—indeed, they are a “curse,” and the one who utilizes them “is a second Judas who betrays the Christ.” (9)  To replace Craig’s modern apologetics, Penner advocates a post-modern Christian witness that edifies by adhering to an ethic of belief and witness. 

Monday, February 27, 2017

Licona's Resurrection Masterpiece, Part IV - Concluding Critique

The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach.  By Michael R. Licona.  Downers Grove: IVP Academic, 2010, 718 pp., $40.00. 

Michael R. Licona’s The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach (IVP Academic, 2011), represents a substantive scholarly contribution to the wealth of academic literature on the resurrection.  In this series of 4 blog essays, I am providing an in-depth interaction with Licona’s careful work.  In the first three essays I summarized and interacted with the main chapters.  Now it is time to dive into some constructive criticism.

Critique and Concluding Thoughts

Licona’s New Historiographical Approach to the resurrection of Jesus truly is unique and valuable.  He makes a significant addition to the conversation about a central issue in Christian doctrine and history.  He provides an unparalleled discussion of historiographical concerns, including a rational and persuasive summons to all historical Jesus scholars to bracket their own horizons when approaching their subject-material.  Nonetheless, no scholar is perfect, and there are a couple of critiques I would like to close with.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Licona's Resurrection Masterpiece, Part III - Weighing Competing Historical Hypotheses of Jesus' Post-Mortem Fate

The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach.  By Michael R. Licona.  Downers Grove: IVP Academic, 2010, 718 pp., $40.00. 

Michael R. Licona’s The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach (IVP Academic, 2011), represents a substantive scholarly contribution to the wealth of academic literature on the resurrection.  In this series of 4 blog essays, I am providing an in-depth interaction with Licona’s careful work.  In the first two essays I covered the book’s overall structure and Licona’s significant historical work on historiography, miracle-claims, historical Jesus sources, and bedrock data concerning Jesus’s fate.  In this post, I want to engage Licona’s assessment of various historical hypotheses that seek to account for the historical bedrock.  Next week, we will critically analyze the strengths, weaknesses, and contributions of the overall work.

Chapter 5 – Weighing Hypotheses

Having discussed historical methodology, the possibility of investigating historical miracle-claims, the relevant historical sources, and the historical bedrock pertaining to Jesus’ post-mortem fate, Licona finally turns to the crux of the matter—determining what actually happened to Jesus after his crucifixion. 

Monday, February 20, 2017

Licona's Resurrection Masterpiece, Part II - Historical Sources & Bedrock

The Resurrection of Jesus: Miracles, Sources, & Bedrock

Michael R. Licona’s The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach (IVP Academic, 2011), represents a substantive scholarly contribution to the wealth of academic literature on the resurrection.  In this series of 4 blog essays, I am providing an in-depth interaction with Licona’s careful work.  In the first essay (February 16) I covered the book’s overall structure and the first section (on Philosophy of History).  In this post, I will historical inquiry & miracle-claims (Chapter 2), source-material pertaining to the post-mortem fate of Jesus (Chapter 3), and historical bedrock data that historical hypotheses regarding Jesus’ fate must account for (Chapter 4).

Chapter 2 – The Historian and Miracles

Licona’s purpose in discussing horizons is to encourage historical Jesus scholars not to a priori reject certain hypotheses or possibilities due to their worldview presuppositions. 

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Licona's Resurrection Masterpiece, Part I - Philosophy of History

The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach.  By Michael R. Licona.  Downers Grove: IVP Academic, 2010, 718 pp., $40.00. 

The resurrection of Jesus Christ stands at the center of the historic Christian faith, making it a focus of scholarly theological focus.  The Apostle Paul declares that if Christ has not been raised, then Christian faith is in vain (1 Cor. 15).  The resurrection is also the key historical miracle-claim in Christianity, making it a focus of scholarly historical investigation.  Given that the resurrection is a riveting topic of theological and historical investigation, it is no surprise that scholarly articles and books focusing on the resurrection continue to proliferate.  By Gary Habmeras’ count, there were approximately 3400 journals and books written in English, German, and French, on the subject of Jesus’ resurrection between 1975 and 2002 (see particularly his 2005 article on the topic in the Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus 3.2).
Michael R. Licona’s The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach (IVP Academic, 2011), represents a substantive scholarly contribution to the wealth of academic literature on the resurrection.  Licona serves as Research Professor at Houston Baptist University, and is a popular apologetic speaker and well-known debater, having engaged (among others) Bart Ehrman, Elaine Pagels, Shabir Ally, and Richard Carrier.  Licona’s Resurrection is an excellent addition to the corpus of literature on the historical core of Christianity, an absolute must-read for resurrection buffs, and a necessary resource for historical Jesus scholars.  In this series of 4 blog essays, I intend to engage in an in-depth examination of Licona’s book.  I will provide a brief summary of the broad structure of Licona’s work.  I will lay out key sections of his dissertation more thoroughly in order to highlight unique contributions he makes to the scholarly discussion.  I will then critically engage key sections of his argument.
Licona’s research began with the observation that studies of Jesus’ resurrection are marked by a lack of consensus,

Monday, February 13, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics VIII - Engaging Contemporary Culture

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics


In earlier posts, I set the framework for the core material in Imaginative Apologetics, seeking to provide the lay of the land in contemporary apologetics and the faculty of imagination.  Now we are engaging the individual articles in Andrew Davison’s edited volume, Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition.[1]  In this final post, I look at the 4th and final major section of the work, and make some general comments on the book as a whole.  As a reminder, you can find my full treatment in Trinity Journal.[2]

Situating Christian Apologetics

The fourth and final section of Imaginative Apologetics (“Situating Christian Apologetics”) contains three chapters attempting to place contemporary apologetics in cultural and historical context.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics VII - Being Imaginative about Christian Apologetics

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics


In earlier posts, I set the framework for the core material in Imaginative Apologetics, seeking to provide the lay of the land in contemporary apologetics and the faculty of imagination.  Now we are engaging the individual articles in Andrew Davison’s edited volume, Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition.[1]  In the last two posts, we examined the relationship between faith and reason, and apologetics & human imagination.  In this post, on to the third of four major sections of the work.  As a reminder, you can find my full treatment in Trinity Journal.[2]

Being Imaginative about Christian Apologetics

Section three (“Being Imaginative about Christian Apologetics”) of Imaginative Apologetics begins with, in my opinion, the strongest essay of the compilation.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics VI - Christian Apologetics and the Human Imagination

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics


In earlier posts, I set the framework for the core material in Imaginative Apologetics, seeking to provide the lay of the land in contemporary apologetics and the faculty of imagination.  Now we are engaging the individual articles in Andrew Davison’s edited volume, Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition.[1]  Last post, I gave in-depth consideration of the two articles considering the relationship between faith and reason.  In this post, on to the second of four major sections of the work.  As a reminder, you can find my full treatment in Trinity Journal.[2]

Christian Apologetics and the Human Imagination

Section two of Imaginative Apologetics (“Christian Apologetics and the Human Imagination”) comprises three strong articles noting the importance of imagination and literature in Christian apologetics.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics V - Faith & Reason Reconsidered

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics


In my past 4 posts, I have been setting the framework for the core material in Imaginative Apologetics, an excellent compilation of essays edited by Andrew Davison arguing for the centrality of the faculty of imagination in the apologetic enterprise.  I have laid out the historical and contemporary scene of Christian apologetics, and considered Vanhoozer’s and Smith’s contributions to an understanding of imagination.  It is time now for the meat: interaction with the individual articles in Imaginative Apologetics.  This material is derived from my article in Trinity Journal.[1]

Engaging Imaginative Apologetics

Andrew Davison compiles ten articles (plus a robust foreword and introduction) to promote a return to apologetic imagination. The contributors are broadly-catholic British scholars (the one exception is Craig Hovey, from Ashland University, Ohio), although each author admirably avoids sectarianism and denominational polemics. As with all edited collections, the chapters vary in perspective and strength. In this case, the authors also differ in their understanding and exposition of the two key terms of the book’s title: imagination and apologetics.
Davison’s introduction lays out the overarching vision and purpose of the work. The ten individual chapters are broken into four broad sections: (1) Faith and Reason Reconsidered; (2) Christian Apologetics and the Human Imagination; (3) Being Imaginative about Christian Apologetics; and (4) Situating Christian Apologetics.  I will post blog essays engaging with the articles in (respectively) each of the 4 major sections of the anthology, usually offering concise summaries of the content, strengths, and weaknesses of each chapter. A few chapters will receive more in-depth treatment than others, mostly marking areas of my own particular interest and expertise.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics Part IV - Smith, Vanhoozer, and The Place of Apologetic Imagination

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics

            This is the 4th in a series of blog posts covering a review article I wrote for Trinity Journal,[1] a lengthy interaction with Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition, edited by Andrew Davison.[2]
Previously in this series of posts, I surveyed the terrain of historical and contemporary Christian apologetics, and began a consideration of the place of imagination in apologetics. I want to continue that examination with a focus upon the insights of Kevin Vanhoozer and Jamie Smith. In subsequent posts, I will interact with the various articles in Imaginative Apologetics.
Situating Imagination
In the view of Andrew Davison, editor of and contributor to Imaginative Apologetics, too many current apologetic works are marked by a paucity of imagination. Many apologetic works focus so strongly on rational arguments and proofs that they become “cold or arid.” Thus, the goal of Imaginative Apologetics is to make apologetics “a matter of wonder and desire,” a presentation of a Christian truth “that is supremely attractive and engaging.”[3] Davison and his contributors find some similarly-concerned company in the contemporary scene of Christian philosophy and apologetics.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics, Part III - The Need for Imagination in Apologetics

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics

            A couple years ago, I had opportunity to write a review article for Trinity Journal,[1] a lengthy interaction with Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition, edited by Andrew Davison.[2] I never took the opportunity to share some of those thoughts here – I now aim to rectify that! 
In my last couple of blog posts, I surveyed the terrain of historical and contemporary Christian apologetics. I want you now to consider the place of imagination in Christian thought and apologetics. In subsequent posts, I will interact with the various articles in Imaginative Apologetics.
Situating Imagination: Imaginative Apologetics & Classical Apologetics
In the view of Andrew Davison, editor of and contributor to Imaginative Apologetics, apologetics is frequently marked by a paucity of imagination. Many apologetic works focus so strongly on rational arguments and proofs that they become “cold or arid.” Thus, the goal of Imaginative Apologetics is to make apologetics “a matter of wonder and desire,” a presentation of a Christian truth “that is supremely attractive and engaging.”[3]

Friday, January 20, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics, Part II - Situating Apologetics

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics

            I’d like to continue sharing some thoughts from a review article I wrote for Trinity Journal,[1] a lengthy interaction with Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition, edited by Andrew Davison.[2] In my previous blog post, I sought to articulate some of the biblical mandate for apologetics.  In this post, we want to look at just a few historical and contemporary apologetic trends.
In subsequent posts, we’ll look at the place of imagination in Christian scholarship and apologetics, focusing especially on Jamie Smith’s recent contributions. Down the road, I will interact with the various articles in Imaginative Apologetics.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Imaginative Apologetics, Part I - Situating Apologetics: A New Blogging Year!

Apologetics, Imagination, and Imaginative Apologetics

            A couple years ago, I had opportunity to write a review article for Trinity Journal,[1] a lengthy interaction with Imaginative Apologetics: Theology, Philosophy and the Catholic Tradition, edited by Andrew Davison.[2] I never took the opportunity to share some of those thoughts here – I now aim to rectify that!  I would like to resume somewhat-faithful blogging this year, so this is my first beginning on that road.
In the first couple of blog posts, I will survey the terrain of historical and contemporary Christian apologetics. In subsequent posts, we’ll look at the place of imagination in Christian scholarship and apologetics, focusing especially on Jamie Smith’s recent contributions. Down the road, I will interact with the various articles in Imaginative Apologetics.